Credit Freeze – Also known as a security freeze, this free tool lets you restrict access to your credit report, which in turn makes it more difficult for identity thieves to open new accounts in your name. That’s because most creditors need to see your credit report before they approve a new account. If they can’t see your report, they may not extend the credit.

A credit freeze does not affect your credit score and also does not:

  • prevent you from getting your free annual credit report
  • keep you from opening a new account, but to open one, you’ll need to lift the freeze temporarily. It’s free to lift the freeze and free to place it again when you’re done accessing your credit.
  • keep you from applying for a job, renting an apartment, or buying insurance. The freeze doesn’t apply to these actions so you don’t need to lift it.
  • prevent a thief from making charges to your existing accounts. You still need to monitor all bank, credit card and insurance statements for fraudulent transactions.
  • stop pre-screened offers.  If you want to stop getting prescreened offers of credit, call 888-5OPTOUT (888-567-8688) or go online. The phone number and website are operated by the nationwide credit bureaus. You can opt out for five years or permanently. However, some companies send offers that are not based on prescreening, and your federal opt-out right will not stop those kinds of solicitations.  As you consider opting out, you should know that prescreened offers can provide many benefits, especially if you are in the market for a credit card or insurance. Prescreened offers can help you learn about what’s available, compare costs, and find the best product for your needs. Because you are pre-selected to receive the offer, you can be turned down only under limited circumstances. The terms of prescreened offers also may be more favorable than those that are available to the general public. In fact, some credit card or insurance products may be available only through prescreened offers.
  • Certain entities still will have access to your credit report.  Your report can be released to your existing creditors or to debt collectors acting on their behalf.  Government agencies may have access in response to a court or administrative order, a subpoena, or a search warrant.

Credit Bureau Contact Info

Contact the national credit bureaus to request active duty alerts, fraud alerts, credit freezes (also known as security freezes), and opt outs from pre‑screened credit offers.

Equifax
Equifax.com/personal/credit-report-services
800-685-1111

Experian
Experian.com/help
888-EXPERIAN (888-397-3742)

Transunion
TransUnion.com/credit-help
888-909-8872

 

Protect your entire household for only $25 per month total

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